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Measurement Conversion Chart

 

Wine Making and Homebrewing Measurement Conversion Chart

A note about kitchen measurements:

Not all tablespoons are the same. The Australian tablespoon is 20 ml; the British tablespoon is 17.7 ml. In most Canadian recipes the tablespoon is 15 ml while the American tablespoon is actually 14.2 ml.
In British, Austrailian and sometimes Canadian recipes, the imperial pint  is used which is 20 fluid ounces. American and sometimes Canadian recipes use the American pint of 16 fluid ounces.
 
Watch Out!
Always remember to double check your recipe. There is a big difference between Fluid Ounces which is a volume measurement and Dry Ounces which is a weight measurement. See further explanation below the following chart!
 

Liquid or Volume Measures (approximate)
1 teaspoon
 
1/3 tablespoon
5 ml
1 tablespoon
1/2 fluid ounce
3 teaspoons
15 ml    15 cc
2 tablespoons
1 fluid ounce
1/8 cup, 6 teaspoons
30 ml,   30 cc
1/4 cup
2 fluid ounces
4 tablespoons
59 ml
1/3 cup
2 2/3 fluid ounces
5 tablespoons & 1 teaspoon
79 ml
1/2 cup
4 fluid ounces
8 tablespoons
118 ml
2/3 cup
5 1/3 fluid ounces
10 tablespoons & 2 teaspoons
158 ml
3/4 cup
6 fluid ounces
12 tablespoons
177 ml
7/8 cup
7 fluid ounces
14 tablespoons
207 ml
1 cup
8 fluid ounces/ 1/2 pint
16 tablespoons
237 ml
2 cups
16 fluid ounces/ 1 pint 
32 tablespoons
473 ml
4 cups
32 fluid ounces
1 quart
946 ml
1 pint
16 fluid ounces/ 1 pint 
32 tablespoons
473 ml
2 pints
32 fluid ounces
1 quart
946 ml     0.946 liters
8 pints
1 gallon/ 128 fluid ounces
 
3785 ml   3.78 liters
4 quarts
1 gallon/128 fluid ounces
 
3785 ml    3.78 liters
1 liter
1.057 quarts
 
1000 ml
128 fluid ounces
1 gallon
 
3785 ml    3.78 liters
 
 
 
 
DRY or WEIGHT Measurements (approximate)
1 ounce
 
30 grams  (28.35 g)
 
2 ounces
 
55 grams
 
3 ounces
 
85 grams
 
4 ounces
1/4 pound
125 grams
 
8 ounces
1/2 pound
240 grams
 
12 ounces
3/4 pound
375 grams
 
16 ounces
1 pound
454 grams
 
32 ounces
2 pounds
907 grams
 
1 kilogram
2.2 pounds/ 35.2 ounces
1000 gram
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
When it comes to wine making supplies and ingredients we often get asked how many teaspoons in a pound of potassium metabisulfite or in a pound of potassium sorbate. Well, neither will be the same as pound of potassium sorbate occupies about three times the space as a pound of potassium metabisulfite.
 
A lot of people are confused about the term "dry measure". This term refers to volume, not weight. The only difference between a dry measuring cup and a liquid measuring cup is that a dry measure is flat on top so that it can be leveled. A liquid measure has a spout on it. They both measure the same volume. Teaspoons and tablespoons are designed to be leveled also. There is no such thing as a "dry teaspoon" or "dry tablespoon". They are used to measure the volume of both liquid and dry ingredients.

Here is some useful information on measuring ingredients:

First of all, the knuckleheads who invented the English System gave the same unit name (ounces) to both volume and weight. A lot of people get these two types of ounces confused. They are not the same and they are not interchangeable!

The reason for this is because every ingredient has a different density. For example, a cup of lead pellets and a cup of feathers both occupy 8 fluid ounces of volume. However, if you weigh them, they won't weigh the same and they won't weigh 8 ounces! Trying to convert grams or ounces (weight) into cups would be the same thing as trying to convert inches into pounds or hours into cups.

Recipes use "volume", "weight", "temperature", "time" and sometimes "length" as a way to measure things (none of these measurement forms are interchangeable). The abbreviation "oz" refers to weight and the abbreviation "fl.oz" refers to volume. When you see "oz" in a recipe, use a scale; when you see "fl. oz" in a recipe, use a measuring spoon or measuring cup. Recipe authors are SUPPOSED to follow this rule.

The ONLY way to do a volume/weight conversion is to look at a chart that lists how much a cup of some ingredient weighs (some cookbooks have charts like this).
 

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